Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Aviation Insurance Resources – What’s in it for Me?

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Before most decisions are made, in one form or another, the decision-maker asks, “What’s in it for me?” Before you decided to purchase an aircraft, many questions whirled through your mind. But they all pointed back to how that purchase benefits YOU. With several aviation insurance brokers at your hands, how do you choose the agent that best fits your needs? Here’s what’s in it for you at Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR):

  • Pilots Protecting Pilots – It’s not just a fancy tagline on our website. It’s truth. All the agents at AIR are pilots so we all share a unique experience and love for the air as our customers. We work closely with insurance underwriters to serve the needs of the pilot population. For example, AIR has led the industry in insuring unmanned aircraft (UAS/UAVs) and light sport aircraft (LSAs) with ease.
  • Specialists – From non-owned to personal owned aircraft, from single-ship flight schools to corporate aircraft fleets, from workers compensation to event liability, we specialize in all things aviation. Not boats. Not cars. Not health insurance. Aviation insurance. We understand the nuances of aviation insurance and the details necessary to provide proper coverage.
  • All Markets – To become appointed with an insurance carrier, aviation insurance brokers must go through a vetting process. This means meeting specific standards of practice and policy minimums. Not all agents have access to all these markets, but AIR does. These markets are all vying for your business therefore creating competition and keeping your aircraft insurance rates low.
  • Choice – With AIR you are not married to one quote and one policy’s set of conditions. If you have certain specific needs (approved training facilities, lower open pilot warranty, higher limits) AIR can supply a more flexible policy by shopping all the aviation insurance markets. We can tailor a policy to you!

So, what’s in it for you? A team of dedicated, knowledgeable, pilots providing you with the broadest policy at the best available rates. To find what’s in it for you call 877-247-7767 or submit and insurance quote request online today!

 

What Happens if My Aircraft is Involved in an Accident?

Thursday, March 22nd, 2018

We all realize that there is risk involved in owning and operating an aircraft. Comprehensive aviation insurance policies afford substantial protection from that risk. We hope you’ll never face a situation that puts your aviation insurance to the test. But if you have a mishap from which property damage or injury result, it is helpful to understand how the aviation claims process works.

What Can Trigger a Claim?

Most aircraft insurance policies respond to two types of claims: those that involve physical damage to the insured aircraft and those resulting in legal liability that result from damaging someone else’s property or causing an injury. The details can vary from one policy to the next. In this article, we will consider mostly physical damage claims.

Some of the most common types of insured damage to an aircraft result from events like these:

  • Hard landings
  • Bird or wildlife strikes
  • Gear-up landings
  • Collisions with hangars, buildings or support vehicles
  • Taxiing incidents
  • Wind, lightning, or hail storms

Legal liability can result from many of these events, which cause damage not only to the insured aircraft, but to third party property as well. Examples are hitting a runway light, colliding with a hangar or ramp aircraft, jet wash and prop wash, or even something like paint overspray.

Of course, aircraft mishaps that result in injuries to passengers aboard the aircraft, people on the ground or even in another aircraft are also a serious concern.

Because each aircraft incident or accident is unique, it is important to be familiar with the provisions of your insurance policy and what the process is for getting the insurance provider involved to protect your interests.

The Aircraft Insurance Physical Damage Claims Process — Step by Step

When aviation incidents or accidents causing damage to the insured aircraft occur, the claims process typically is as follows:

Step One: Immediately following an incident or accident. First and foremost, seek medical attention for anyone who has been injured. As soon as reasonably possible, contact your insurance broker or the insurance provider directly to notify them of the loss and to coordinate next steps. It is also important to protect the aircraft from further damage.

Step Two: Gather pilot information. Take steps to secure copies of the pilot’s license and logbook, medical certificate, the aircraft log books and all other aircraft documents. In addition to cooperating with any investigating authorities such as the FAA or NTSB, the insurance provider may ask that you complete an incident report describing the pertinent details.

Step Three: You and the insurance provider begin the process of determining whether the aircraft is economically repairable. It may be necessary to obtain repair proposals to determine whether the damage is repairable or whether the aircraft is a total loss. A number of factors, including the aircraft’s insured value, the complexity of the repairs and particular policy provisions may come into play.

Step Four: In the event the aircraft is repairable, you will authorize the repair facility to make the repairs. Virtually all policies pay for the cost of repairs with “materials of like kind and quality.” In other words, the goal of the repair is to restore the aircraft to the condition it was in just prior to the incident.

Step Five: When the final cost to repair is established, the insurance provider will calculate the amount it will pay you. You can use that payment, plus your own payment for any deductible amount or uncovered costs, to pay the repair facility, after which the aircraft is returned to service. In most cases, the process is then complete.

Step Six: If the damage renders the aircraft a total loss, the insurance provider will make payment for the insured value, less any deductible. The policy will specify how the loss will be made payable, and typically requires that you and any lienholders are included in the payment. The insurance provider is entitled to the benefit of its remaining value once a total loss is paid. Within practical economic constraints, your preference as to the disposition of the aircraft may be taken into consideration as part of an agreed cash settlement. You should expect to work with your insurance provider to finalize the transaction through an FAA Aircraft Bill of Sale and an insurance document known as a Proof of Loss used to document the transaction.

Tips for Streamlining the Aircraft Insurance Claims Process

You and your insurance provider have a common goal when it comes to aviation claim handling: to resolve the claim promptly to the mutual satisfaction of the parties in accordance with the terms and conditions of the insurance policy. Here are some tips for streamlining the claim process:

Review your aviation insurance information periodically to ensure you have a general understanding of the insurance benefits afforded by your policy.

Report incidents promptly. The more time that elapses between an incident and the initiation of the claim process, the more difficult and time-consuming it can be for the insurance provider to perform research and reach proper determinations on what amounts are payable.

View your interaction with the insurance provider as a collaboration. The insurance provider’s goal is to provide prompt and fair claim handing and settlement of claims, in accordance with the terms and conditions of the insurance policy. Your cooperation makes the process much more efficient.

Understand the concept of “like kind and quality” when it comes to repairs. The goal of a repair is not to make an aircraft “like new,” but rather to return it to its condition immediately prior to the incident. Along those same lines, conditions discovered during the repair process that are not directly the result of damage sustained in the incident may not be payable under the policy. During the repair process, stay in close contact with the repair facility and the claims handler to fully understand what repairs will be reimbursable under the policy.

Consider the reality that a serious accident could occur. Ensure that anyone who may be involved in managing your affairs, such as a spouse, family member or business partner, knows where to find important information about your aircraft (pilot and aircraft log books, for example) and your insurance policy. Also, give some thought to how your aircraft is registered to make its disposition easiest on your next of kin.

Ensure that anyone you allow to operate your aircraft is properly trained and credentialed to do so and that they meet the pilot requirements of your insurance policy.

Take advantage of technology like your smartphone camera and digital documents to capture and share information about the incident with your insurance provider.

Partnering to Simplify the Aviation Insurance Claim Process

Your insurance provider’s top priority is handling your aviation losses efficiently and effectively so you can receive the appropriate benefit promptly. Treating this interaction as a collaboration is the best way to achieve a satisfying outcome.

3rd Annual Aviation Scholarship Announced

Thursday, March 1st, 2018

Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR), a leading aircraft insurance broker based in Frederick, MD, holds fast to their tagline of “Pilots Protecting Pilots”. All the aviation insurance agents at AIR are pilots, and pilots that give back to the community they serve. Today, AIR announced they will be offering their Get into the Air aviation scholarship for a 3rd year.

Previous scholarship winners come from all walks of life, to include an aviation museum director and ice skater working towards a private pilot certificate, a student pilot following in the footsteps of her idols the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP), and an aircraft dispatcher who endured a 2-hour commute to learn to fly.

AIR is offering their $500 scholarship to an entrant who shows similar determination, drive, and positive character of the past winners. Applicants will be judged on their one-page essay and a recommendation letter from someone within the aviation industry. The scholarship winner will be announced at the 2018 EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, WI. The deadline to enter is June 15th. Scholarship applications are available for download at http://www.AIR-PROS.com/scholarship.php.

About Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR)

Since 1999, AIR has remained closely connected to the industry they serve, many of their customers are friends and some are even family. This is because all the agents at AIR are pilots and understand the needs and challenges in owning or renting an aircraft and aviation related businesses. No matter your involvement in aviation, AIR can provide a comprehensive yet economical solution for your needs. For scholarship questions or an aircraft insurance quote call 877-247-7767 or fill out a quote request online today!

AIR to Attend 2018 US Sport Aviation Expo

Thursday, January 4th, 2018

The 14th Annual US Sport Aviation Expo (also known simply as Sebring to pilots) is fast approaching! From January 24-27th pilots and exhibitors will gather at Sebring Regional Airport for four days of aviation fun. Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR) agents Joe Cacho and Gregg Ellsworth will be in booth 410 to help pilots with their aviation insurance needs.

This year’s Sebring highlights include:

  • Key Note Speaker Captain Rahmani, the first female fixed-wing pilot with the Afghan Air Force
  • Ford Tri-Motor flights, helicopter and biplane rides
  • 2nd & 3rd class medical exams on site
  • Zenith hands-on kit building workshop
  • DroneZone – featuring one of the largest drone races in the world
  • Exhibitor showcase flights
  • Workshops, forums (including speakers Patty Wagstaff and Rod Machado), and aircraft displays

Tickets are $25/day or $75 for a four-day pass for adults. EAA and AOPA members can receive a $5 per day discount. Youth tickets are $10 a day and children 10 and under are free. Tickets are available online and at the door.

The US Sport Aviation Expo offers the perfect start to the airshow and aviation convention season. We hope to see you there!

Essex Flying Club Increases Pilot Population

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

In 2015 Essex Flying Club was formed to provide “ready access to the aircraft, camaraderie, and more affordable flying to all members”. This 10-member club based out of Essex Skypark Airport inEssex
Baltimore, MD currently holds the record as the most active aircraft at the airport. The vintage Cessna 172 Skyhawk has since seen many “firsts” from solos, to check rides and flyouts.

Pilots Dean Frail and Claudius Klimt designed the club to decrease the cost of flying and to increase the number of pilots at Essex Skypark. The emphasis is on competent flying. The one-time entry cost is only $600 with a $95/hour wet tach time. Members pay for 2.5 hrs per month, use it or loose it. This non-profit club’s Cessna Skyhawk is managed by volunteers and maintained by a superb mechanic.

Recently, the club was renamed to The Max Lichty Essex Flying Club in honor of Max Lichty, a 10,000-hour pilot and chief pilot at the flying club. The longtime resident of Essex Skypark was a passionate supporter of the flying club. Max lost his battle to cancer earlier this year and the members decided this was the best way to honor a great pilot and friend.

As the list grows for the upgrades and repairs on their aircraft, so does the number of new private pilots the club has graduated.  The plan is to continue for years to come. The Max Lichty Essex Flying Club thanks Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR) for its role in keeping flying affordable at Essex Skypark. AIR shopped all the aviation insurance markets to ensure this new club was receiving the best rates at the broadest possible coverage.

To learn more about The Max Lichty Essex Flying Club visit: http://www.essexflyingclub.org/.

Looking for an insurance quote for your flying club? Call 301-682-6200 to talk to one of our knowledgeable pilots and agents or request a quote online today!

Up in Smoke

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017

Originally posted in Cessna Pilot’s Association Magazine

By Guy R. Maher

Early this year, my 1956 310 was in the shop of my preferred maintenance facility, Iredell Aircare, Statesville, NC, for an annual inspection when the shop caught on fire. The plane was one of five lost due to extreme heat and smoke damage.

Miraculously, the fire never made it to the shop floor so the planes never actually caught on fire. The danger and added devastation that could have resulted if the fire had reached the floor and the airplanes is something all of us chose not to ponder too long. The fire crews did a terrific job of extinguishing the blaze without any injury.

The impact this event had on the long standing maintenance business is a story for another time. But I am happy to report that due to, in part, support from Iredell Aircare’s customers, friends, airport management, and efforts facilitated through organizations such as our very own Cessna Pilots Association (CPA), they will be remaining in business. And this was a huge relief to their many customers – myself included.

The owner/operators, Jones and Rachel Barnes, are of retirement age and this could have been their reason to call it quits. But that would have been a huge loss to the aviation community and a horrible way to end such a distinguished run.  This is not only because of their unmatched wealth of knowledge in maintaining GA aircraft – especially legacy airplanes – but for their equal level of kindness and caring for their customers.

The fire broke out on the afternoon of Saturday, January 7. My wife and I were enroute to Cancun, Mexico at the time on American Airlines and oblivious to what was going on. I didn’t learn of the fire until around 5 pm on the following Tuesday. My wife and I had just returned to our hotel from a day of SCUBA diving and this is what showed up in my email from the FBO manager:

Dear Guy:

On Saturday, Jones and Rachel’s hangar burned and N5267A was one of the five airplanes inside.  I am so sorry to interrupt your vacation with this news.  Jones and Rachel did not want to ruin your vacation, but I thought you might prefer to be in the know.  They have contacted their insurer and that process is underway.  Is there anyone we can notify on your behalf?

So sorry for the bad news.

Thomas

The fact that Jones and Rachel didn’t want me to know while away on vacation speaks volumes to the 19 year relationship I’ve enjoyed with them. They are good friends as well as service providers. Not only that, they knew how special that 310 was to me.

I am a die-hard classic Cessna 310 fan. This one was my second classic and the plane I expected to run out most of my remaining ownership clock with – the “keeper”. N5267A was at that stage of aircraft ownership we all strive for – incredibly reliable at dispatch – Start, Fly, Land, Repeat.

You just read about one such extended trip in the past two issues of this magazine. And if being on time to an appointment was critical, I always allowed an extra 15 minutes on the arrival because I’d usually have an instant reception on out of town ramps of pilots wanting to know more about this fully restored and updated plane.

The first thing I did was send a return email to the FBO thanking Thomas for letting me know. I then sent a combined email to both the FBO and my insurance broker Joe Ruck of Air-Pros [jruck@air-pros.com] to close that loop. Within 10 minutes I received this reply from Joe:

I will notify your insurance carrier and will have a claims adjuster assigned to this incident.  There is really nothing you can do from where you are, so my advice to you is to get a glass of wine, enjoy the sunset, and make the most of your vacation!

My wife and I took his advice. And upon returning home later that following Saturday, my voicemail had a message on it from the insurance claims adjuster, Jim Brewer, [Inflite Aviation International Adjusters, Denver, NC]. On Sunday we had a full plate of church and family activities to attend. But I did call Brewer, as well as Jones just to see how he was doing. He told me Brewer had already been out to the airport twice working on my claim.

It wasn’t until Monday that I finally made it out to the airport to see the aftermath. What a terrible mess. Jones walked me through the dark hangar that looked and smelled like metallic death. The thick, corrosive smoke and over 1,600 degree heat sealed the fate of these five planes – my 310, a Piper Comanche, a Cessna 177RG, a Cessna 414, and a Grumman Tiger.

Seeing these planes – especially my 310 – gave me more of a numb feeling than anything else. The heat had been so intense you could see how the tempered metal skin caved between the ribs and stringers and the windows melted or bubbled. The corrosive nature of the smoke was something I had never seen before. My engines looked like they had thick crystals growing on the cylinders. Tools looked like they had been on a salt water boat dock for a year.

It was clear these planes were a total loss. Brewer and I met a few days later to get me into the claims loop. He had some forms for me to fill out and we set up a follow-up time for when we’d meet to finish my part of the process – providing the signed forms, a signed bill of sale, and all the aircraft records.

Brewer has been at this for decades. He told me that my claim was about as cut and dried as it gets. He could tell from what he saw, as well as from the records, that the 310 was well cared for. He loves airplanes and it showed.

In the first week or so after the fire, I was reminded of just how much the aviation community cares about other owners and pilots – even those they don’t know – and especially if they are a part of an owners group like CPA. Here are a few examples of the tone of most of the posts and emails I received:

I can tell that this was more than just “an airplane”. You poured your heart and soul into making it one of the nicest “Classic 310s” around. This was your passion; your pride and joy. It was a thing of beauty. I’m sorry for your loss.

Guy, so sorry to hear this. I can’t imagine how terrible you must be feeling after having this happen to your pride and joy. It was such gorgeous airplane. I hope that in the future you are able to find another plane that in all respects is as good or better than the beautiful plane you had.  If anyone can find one it’s you.

For those of us who love these airplanes, they are like living beings…and it has to be horrifying to get that kind of news.  Here’s hoping you’re able to create some new memories with a new “baby”.

I received some posts and emails where I was gently asked if there were any salvage possibilities from my plane or what I planned to do next, but only when I felt ready to talk about it. I was being treated as if I had lost a relative or a beloved pet. To some of us, I guess, we hold our planes more dear than even some relatives! I assured them that I was fine and no question was off limits.

Another big question posed to me was how I would fare on insurance. I quickly knew I would be just fine. Here’s where the value of a good broker – who actually works for the client, gives solid advice, and jumps right in when there is a problem – can’t be overstated. This is because your broker is the hub of the team. Joe placed me with Hallmark Insurance Company through Hallmark’s agent, Aerospace Insurance Managers, Inc.

In my case, I had a check on the 27th day following the fire. There were a number of “make sense” required steps involved and Brewer kept me informed every step of the way. I couldn’t have been more pleased at how I was treated throughout the entire process – and with its resolve.

My policy was written – as are most aircraft policies these days – with a stated value. This means that what the owner has stated or requested to be the value he wants to insure the plane for – and is accepted by the underwriter – will be what the underwriter pays the owner [less deductible, if any] if it’s a total loss.

My 310 was insured at about the top of the scale for a plane of this vintage and roughly 50% more than most classic 310’s in similar condition. And in all truth, that was about 50% more than I could have sold it for. And yet, I was able to insure it for that amount. How? By taking the right steps through a broker who knows how to advocate for a client, and with an underwriter who knows how to balance the market with client needs.

Here’s what I did correctly: [1] When I bought the plane I determined through my own appraisal, as well as general research, what it would take to replace it versus what I paid. The replacement value was higher than my purchase price so that’s what I asked my broker to use for my initial quote. [2] In that request, I provided the broker with a detailed description of the plane, times, equipment list, and general condition. Joe had no problem placing me with a good company at my requested “stated” value. That was five years ago.

Over the course of ownership, there were those times when I put some considerable funds into the plane. Now, I’m not talking typical maintenance events, like extensive annuals or big repairs. I’m talking about those actions that actually add market value to the plane. These can be items such as new avionics, overhauled engines, new paint and/or interior, etc.

Prior to each one of these events, I reached out to Joe, told him what I was planning to do, and what I expected to need in added stated value. He then went to the underwriter to verify this would be acceptable and what it would cost. As soon as the work was done, we’d initiate the policy change and I’d pay the pro-rata rate for the rest of my policy term.

This emphasizes a couple of points that many owners I talked to as a result of the fire were not aware of. First, aircraft insurance is usually stated value – not the cash value as is with most auto policies. I had a few owners who were taken by surprise at this. Possibly because cash value policies for aircraft are still available. But they are far from the norm.

Second, you can get a stated value that’s higher than average “market” value so long as you can show why it’s higher. And third, you can – and should – update your stated aircraft value when it happens rather than waiting until your policy renewal.

Some may question why I would insure my 310 for considerably over current market value. Here’s why; we purchase insurance to make us as financially whole as we can on the airplane loss, and protect us from liability suits.

When I updated my 310, I was well aware that I was putting more money into the plane than I’d never see on resale. But just because I was willing to invest what I needed and take a paper loss on resale doesn’t mean I was willing to risk that investment should the plane be taken away from me. I lost 67A on an unplanned time schedule – not mine.

That’s why I was adamant about keeping up with my ongoing improvements that added value to the airplane. Brewer told me he had a long talk with the actual underwriter who originally wrote my policy, as well as signed off on the additions. He said I did it the right way, and the increases were well documented and justifiable and he had no problem upping the insured amount.

Some will say that my 310 was an “over insured” plane. And in that situation an underwriter can force you to repair a major damage event instead of declaring what you hoped would be a total loss. Yes, this could happen. But in my case, I wasn’t “over insured”. I insured the plane for my real cash investment.  And I would rather trust that I will get a proper quality repair if it isn’t totaled, than suffer a huge financial loss if it is totaled.

Conversely, if you under insure – declare a stated value of $50,000 on an $80,000 investment for example – to save a few hundred bucks on annual premium and the plane sustains enough damage, the odds are incredibly high that the adjuster will total the plane, sell off the salvage and leave you $30,000 down.

I’ve had owners tell me that when they did major upgrades, such as paint and interior or a big avionics purchase, that their broker told them, “You’ll never get them to approve that increase.” My first question to the broker would be, “So you are saying you’re not willing to ask?”

I know if I wasn’t happy with the service of a lazy broker – pretending to know what an underwriter would say instead of checking – I’d certainly switch brokers. Under certain circumstances, an owner may be maxed out on insurable value – especially if he incorrectly over insured to begin with. The best time to check into all of this is before you make the big upgrade purchase – not after.

An owner relayed this story to me about insurance on his 310,

“I tried to get mine increased to $150,000 after some avionics upgrades.  They refused to up it at all.  Then I asked – ‘what if I had just put new engines on it’ – nope, the initial value is all they would write.  So, I found a new insurance company.  I told them $150K – no problem.  I paid for the extra coverage.”

Besides properly insuring your airplane, the other critical factor is record keeping. I have pounded on this subject in these pages already. But it’s worth another pounding.

In the case of this fire, there were scores of customer logbooks under the care of this shop. Fortunately, Jones had the smarts to install a safe that resembled the massive bank safes you see on TV shows like Gunsmoke. And still, the fire was so intense that it destroyed the lock tumblers and the safe had to be cut to gain access. All the logbooks were intact, with some sustaining a little water and/or smoke damage.

It boggles my mind when I receive airplanes to sell, or examine them as a buyer’s agent to discover that the original logs that came with the plane are the only logs. There are no copies, no digital scans – nothing! I know of many owners who just faithfully – and blindly – turn over their logs to their favorite shop and never look at them again during the course of their ownership. And this even includes not examining them after maintenance actions.

Not only is this not very bright, it’s also against the FAR’s in that you as the pilot in command are responsible for determining if the plane is fit to fly. How are you going to know this unless you check the logs for post maintenance endorsements, annual inspections, IFR certifications, etc.?

What if you have an accident and didn’t know your logs weren’t signed off properly? And then your adjuster asks you to prove the inspection as required by your policy. Now, I can tell you that the old days of aviation insurance companies looking for every way they can to deny or delay a claim are pretty much gone. But the fact is they still have to prove compliance with the terms of your policy.

As Brewer stated, “If the adjuster is looking for something, usually it’s to support the claim, not to delay or avoid the claim.” He added, “Be sure you have copies for anything you carry in the plane – including airworthiness and registration certificates.”

In the case of the fire, it was a little easier. But if the accident – like most of them – is a result of an in-flight operation gone wrong, then those logs are crucial to the claims process.

There’s another reason why the logs are so important.  Because my logs were so complete and detailed – showing the level of care this plane received – my adjuster was able to sell the salvage for double what the plane would have brought had the logs been missing or marginal. And if you think, “What do I care, I got my money?” Remember that when the underwriters total up all the cash in versus cash out for the year, that bottom line goes directly to next year’s rate schedule. It affects us all.

So I adamantly suggest that you take a hard look at your logbook situation. Where are your logs right now? Are they detailed and complete? How much of an impact would it make on you if those logs were lost or destroyed right now? Do you have any back-ups? Can the back-ups be lost or destroyed?

My logs were complete and detailed. The originals were stored in a fire safe at my home. The current set was at the shop since my plane was in for an annual. I had a full digital set stored on my computer and the back-up drive I update each month. And finally, the full set of digital logs were also stored in off-site cloud storage just in case my home-based originals and back-ups were destroyed.

If you must carry your aircraft logs in the plane – such as traveling to a favorite shop for an annual – that’s another big reason for having back-ups. It makes it very easy to prove your plane was in compliance with the reg’s.

You must consider the logs as a critical component of the plane. You wouldn’t come to a shop, accept the plane, pay the bill and fly off with a flap missing. The logs are just as important. Only when you are satisfied with the work, and the logs addressing the work are complete, should you pay the bill and fly home.

Insurance is the one product we buy but hope [along with the underwriter] that we never use. My plan was that I’d have 67A for many more years. I was willing to pay for that in investment versus final return when I was done. But I was not willing to take that loss if the plane was stripped away from me. I know those premium checks can feel hard to write at times. But unless you’re prepared to cover the loss yourself, consider the consequences before cutting your coverage.

So make sure you have the plane properly valued, insured, and documented – with back-ups. Do your homework first. Find a good broker and then keep him/her in the loop throughout the entire coverage year – not just at renewal time.

As a result of how I insured my plane, I came out financially whole and was able to move to the next airplane – a 1973 Cessna 310Q. And in the end, that’s all we can hope for from our underwriter in our effort to keep our flying dreams from going up in smoke.

Fire-8

 

 

Guy R. Maher is a dual-rated ATP/Commercial pilot and CFI for airplanes, helicopters, and instruments. He is an FAA FAASTeam member with nearly 17,000 hours – all civilian general aviation. He operates the aviation services company he founded – Lanier Media – specializing in aircraft sales and acquisitions, type-specific training, multi-media productions, and litigation support. Maher is also an NAAA certified aircraft appraiser and owns a 1973 Cessna 310Q. He can be contacted at laniermedia@gmail.com.

Pilot Back in the AIR after Aviation Scholarship

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Aircraft dispatcher Caitlin Lyons, also known as Cessna Chick on her blog, does not allow adversity to get in the way of her goals. Living in Manhattan without a car during IMG_2015smher private pilot training offered quite the challenge. Her commute the closest general aviation airport resulted in over one and half hours on a train followed by a three mile walk while still maintaining a full-time job!

During the 2016 EAA AirVenture Caitlin caught a break, she had earned the ‘Get into the AIR’ scholarship awarded by Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR). Caitlin thanked AIR for getting her back on track towards her goal of becoming a flight instructor.

“It helped me finally do my BFR which was my first since earning my certificate and was delayed more than I would’ve liked it to be! Since then I was able to fly a bunch in the early winter working on my instrument rating and getting time under my (pink!) foggles – always on beautiful days I would’ve loved to enjoy the views of the Pacific. I’ve already knocked out my Instrument and CFII written tests and working on my Commercial/CFI/FOI written tests as well so I can focus on the flying portions. It puts a time limit on my training and gives me even more motivation. I’m hoping to finish up my instrument rating by the end of the summer!” she explained.

When Cailtin wasn’t flying or studying, she was helping others get into the air. She recently spoke to a bimonthly pilot group at her flight school entitled “Fly Like a Girl” about how to find and apply for aviation scholarships and is “always looking for other ways to pay it forward in return for the opportunities I’ve been given.”

Due to the success of their inaugural scholarship, AIR is once again offering the $500 ‘Get into the AIR’ scholarship. The scholarship can be used towards any phase of flight training, a flight review, written exam, instrument proficiency check or a check ride.

AIR is seeking an applicant whose essay and recommendation letter best describes their goals, drive and involvement in the aviation industry. The scholarship winner will be announced at the 2017 EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, WI. The deadline to enter is June 15th. Scholarship applications are available for download at http://www.AIR-PROS.com/scholarship.php.

About Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR)

Since 1999, AIR has remained closely connected to the industry they serve, many of their customers are friends and some are even family. This is because all of the agents at AIR are pilots and understand the needs and challenges in owning or renting an aircraft and aviation related businesses. No matter your involvement in aviation, AIR can provide a comprehensive yet economical solution for your needs. For scholarship questions or an aircraft insurance quote call 877-247-7767 or fill out a quote request online today!

 

 

 

You won’t believe what plane agents discouraged pilots to purchase…

Wednesday, August 26th, 2015
discourage 2

Yes, we dream about Mustangs, too!

One of the greatest things about attending EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, WI every year is the people we get to meet. From new clients to old friends, there are often stories to be told. Unfortunately, these stories are not always the best. And we are not talking about aircraft accidents, either. What we noticed on several occasions this Oshkosh was several pilots coming up and telling us that their dream aircraft is out of reach because of insurance and that just is not true. Their insurance agent was discouraging them from reaching for their goals.

All aircraft insurance agents at Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR) are pilots and have dream aircraft of our own as well! While we’ll never discourage you from your aviation goals, we will be honest of the insurance costs behind your dream and what the aviation underwriters look for in pilot experience and training.

For example, while at the seaplane base at Oshkosh this year, agent Victoria Zajko spoke with a couple who were going to move to their dream home and purchase a seaplane. They had various models in mind and the husband and wife had different levels of pilot experience. They had been told by an insurance agent (who does not specialize in aircraft insurance) to get a more “basic” plane. After a discussion on their aviation history and goals, they came up with a plan to receive training in one float plane and upgrade after they had a few more hours floatplane under their belt.

At the AIR booth, one gentleman approached president of AIR, Jon Harden, about his worries of insuring an experimental aircraft. After some discussion about the cost benefits of an experimental aircraft as well as the fact that AIR shops all of the markets for the best rate, the pilot walked away with a little more skip in his step.

Victoria enjoys the Oshkosh seaplane base

Victoria enjoys the Oshkosh seaplane base

Whether transitioning to a more advanced aircraft, an experimental aircraft, or learning a new skill such as your seaplane rating, AIR can guide you through the aviation insurance process without leaving you discouraged. Let us

put our years of aviation and insurance expertise together to provide you with the best rate at the broadest coverage available for your dream aircraft.

To see how insurance agents who are also pilots can assist with your aviation dream, please contact Aviation Insurance Resources by calling 301-682-6200 or visit AIR-PROS.com today and receive your aircraft insurance quote! You can also follow us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn, and Google+.

Aviation Insurance Resource Adds Bill Snead to Team of Insurance Experts

Friday, February 27th, 2015

Snead, William - Press Release Photo - Web (55KB)Frederick, MD, February 27, 2015 – Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR), ), a leading provider of insurance brokerage services, announced Friday that aviation insurance veteran Bill Snead has joined Aviation Insurance Resources as National/Signature Accounts Manager effective immediately.

Bill Snead brings over 30 years of invaluable aviation insurance experience as an underwriter, agent, broker, and as the former President of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Insurance Services. Snead has worked with clients in all major aviation insurance lines, including: pleasure and business aviation, commercial aviation, experimental, light sport, antique and warbird aircraft, workers compensation, and both small and large program accounts.

Snead began his aviation career with Avemco Insurance in 1977 as a sales underwriter and over the next 20+ years rose to become one of Avemco’s top regional managers.

Snead next worked with Falcon Insurance, while during his 14 year career there he launched and managed Falcon Insurance Agency Great Lakes, serving as vice president of that company.

Most recently, Snead served as president of AOPA Insurance Agency in Wichita, Kansas.

Snead holds a commercial pilot certificate with instrument rating and served in the U.S. Air Force as a C5A crew chief. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Virginia Commonwealth University.

About Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR)

Snead takes up his post as Aviation Insurance Resources enters its 17th year of serving the aviation community. AIR provides a full range of aircraft insurance and aviation insurance products to clients of all sizes, providing them with the best rates at the broadest coverages available.

Contact
877.247.7767
sales@air-pros.com
PO Box 32
Frederick, MD 21705

 

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Get into the AIR with gyroplane insurance from Aviation Insurance Resources

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

The gyroplane, also known as an autogyro or gyrocopter made its mark early in aviation history, first flown in January of 1923. Since then, gyroplanes have been catching the hearts of pilots around the world. Amelia Earhart even had to get in on the action, breaking a women’s world altitude record in a gyroplane in 1931. With the ability to fly as a helicopter including STOL (short take-off and landing) and float capabilities, the gyroplane is a unique class of aircraft offered in the aviation market that includes that “rotor wing flying” experience. To properly protect a gyroplane, an insurance agency knowledgeable in the rotor wing industry is a must. That company is Aviation Insurance Resources (AIR).

As pilots themselves, AIR agents understand the unique nature of obtaining rotor wing insurance. In fact, they recently invited aviation insurance underwriters to join them on some gyroplane flights so that they could experience first-hand how safely and easily gyroplane aircraft are handled. The fact that AIR is willing to go the extra mile (or fly it!) ensures they are meeting their aviation insurance customers’ needs. Making the customers’ needs priority one is what ranks them among the most respected aviation insurance brokers in the industry.

Do you own or are looking at purchasing a Vortex, Lightning or the new Sportcopter II gyroplane? Perhaps an AutoGyroUSA MTO Sport, Calidus, or Cavalon or a Magni Gyro? Regardless of the brand of the gyrocopter, AIR agents are here to assist you with your gyroplane insurance every step of the way. AIR will get you covered so you are on your way to experiencing “rotor wing flying” in your very own gyrocopter.

Founded in 1999, Aviation Insurance Resources is licensed in all 50 states and has regional offices throughout the country to serve you better! If you are interested in learning more about gyrocopter insurance, helicopter insurance, or aircraft insurance discounts, please contact Aviation Insurance Resources by calling 877-247-7767 or visit AIR-PROS.com today to receive your free Aircraft insurance quote!